RumiBaby
RumiBaby
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subtilitas:

Nieto Sobejano - San Gregorio National Museum extension, Valladolid 2007. Via, 2, photos (C) Roland Halbe. 
subtilitas:

Nieto Sobejano - San Gregorio National Museum extension, Valladolid 2007. Via, 2, photos (C) Roland Halbe. 
subtilitas:

Nieto Sobejano - San Gregorio National Museum extension, Valladolid 2007. Via, 2, photos (C) Roland Halbe. 
subtilitas:

Nieto Sobejano - San Gregorio National Museum extension, Valladolid 2007. Via, 2, photos (C) Roland Halbe. 
subtilitas:

Nieto Sobejano - San Gregorio National Museum extension, Valladolid 2007. Via, 2, photos (C) Roland Halbe. 
subtilitas:

Nieto Sobejano - San Gregorio National Museum extension, Valladolid 2007. Via, 2, photos (C) Roland Halbe. 
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demonagerie:

Karlsruhe : Badische Landesbibliothek. St. Peter perg. 92, detail of f. 6v. Thomas Le Myésier, Breviculum ex artibus Raimundi Lulli electum (c.1321)
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demonagerie:

Bibliothèque nationale de France, Français 13096, f.86v. Apocalypse de S. Jean, en français (1313)
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demonagerie:

British Library, Harley 4751, detail of f. 30v (cats and mouse with mouse stealing the Eucharistic wafers). Bestiary, with extracts from Giraldus Cambrensis on Irish birds. England, S. (Salisbury?). 2nd quarter of the 13th century.
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demonagerie:

Bodleian Library, MS. Auct. D. 4. 14, f. 035r (Rev.XIII, 7. The Beast being worshipped). Apocalypse. England, beginning of the 14th century.
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illuminating-dragon:

National treasure. 1 scroll. Color on paper. Heian - Kamakura period/12-13th century. Tokyo National Museum A-10476
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demonagerie:

British Library, Additional 24189, f.015r (Miniature of astronomers on Mt Athos, above, studying the stars with astrolabes and quadrants and, below, inscribing strange characters in the dust with sticks). Sir John Mandeville, Illustrations for Mandeville’s Travels. Bohemia, 1st quarter of the 15th century. Artist: Master of the Mandeville Travels.
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demonagerie:

Biblioteca Digital Hispánica. Beato de Liébana : códice de Fernando I y Dña. Sancha (1047)
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demonagerie:

British Library, Royal 12 C xix, f. 15v (Satyr). Bestiary, and various theological texts. England North or Central), 1st quarter of the 13th century.
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Plague doctors were individuals in the Middle Ages who were given the task of tending to people infected with the plague. In most cases, they were either second rate or under-trained physicians, incapable of maintaining their own practice. Many were not doctors at all, but people of various other employments paid by towns to cater to the sick. 
Plague doctors were employed in various methods when ever plague set in. The earliest documentation of these individuals being hired go as far back as the mid 500s AD. The plague doctor image that we as a general public are familiar with was not seen until the 1600s. It was then that the “traditional” plague doctor costume was created. The costume consisted of a cloak made of heavy fabric covered in wax to protect the doctor’s body, and a mask to keep out the sick air. The masks had a long cone shaped structure at the nose, to be filled with scents that would protect the doctor from the bad air.
Because of the nature of their work, plague doctors often became victims of the plague themselves, or were quarantined for the protection of the public.

Plague doctors were individuals in the Middle Ages who were given the task of tending to people infected with the plague. In most cases, they were either second rate or under-trained physicians, incapable of maintaining their own practice. Many were not doctors at all, but people of various other employments paid by towns to cater to the sick. 
Plague doctors were employed in various methods when ever plague set in. The earliest documentation of these individuals being hired go as far back as the mid 500s AD. The plague doctor image that we as a general public are familiar with was not seen until the 1600s. It was then that the “traditional” plague doctor costume was created. The costume consisted of a cloak made of heavy fabric covered in wax to protect the doctor’s body, and a mask to keep out the sick air. The masks had a long cone shaped structure at the nose, to be filled with scents that would protect the doctor from the bad air.
Because of the nature of their work, plague doctors often became victims of the plague themselves, or were quarantined for the protection of the public.

Plague doctors were individuals in the Middle Ages who were given the task of tending to people infected with the plague. In most cases, they were either second rate or under-trained physicians, incapable of maintaining their own practice. Many were not doctors at all, but people of various other employments paid by towns to cater to the sick. 
Plague doctors were employed in various methods when ever plague set in. The earliest documentation of these individuals being hired go as far back as the mid 500s AD. The plague doctor image that we as a general public are familiar with was not seen until the 1600s. It was then that the “traditional” plague doctor costume was created. The costume consisted of a cloak made of heavy fabric covered in wax to protect the doctor’s body, and a mask to keep out the sick air. The masks had a long cone shaped structure at the nose, to be filled with scents that would protect the doctor from the bad air.
Because of the nature of their work, plague doctors often became victims of the plague themselves, or were quarantined for the protection of the public.

Plague doctors were individuals in the Middle Ages who were given the task of tending to people infected with the plague. In most cases, they were either second rate or under-trained physicians, incapable of maintaining their own practice. Many were not doctors at all, but people of various other employments paid by towns to cater to the sick. 
Plague doctors were employed in various methods when ever plague set in. The earliest documentation of these individuals being hired go as far back as the mid 500s AD. The plague doctor image that we as a general public are familiar with was not seen until the 1600s. It was then that the “traditional” plague doctor costume was created. The costume consisted of a cloak made of heavy fabric covered in wax to protect the doctor’s body, and a mask to keep out the sick air. The masks had a long cone shaped structure at the nose, to be filled with scents that would protect the doctor from the bad air.
Because of the nature of their work, plague doctors often became victims of the plague themselves, or were quarantined for the protection of the public.

Plague doctors were individuals in the Middle Ages who were given the task of tending to people infected with the plague. In most cases, they were either second rate or under-trained physicians, incapable of maintaining their own practice. Many were not doctors at all, but people of various other employments paid by towns to cater to the sick. 
Plague doctors were employed in various methods when ever plague set in. The earliest documentation of these individuals being hired go as far back as the mid 500s AD. The plague doctor image that we as a general public are familiar with was not seen until the 1600s. It was then that the “traditional” plague doctor costume was created. The costume consisted of a cloak made of heavy fabric covered in wax to protect the doctor’s body, and a mask to keep out the sick air. The masks had a long cone shaped structure at the nose, to be filled with scents that would protect the doctor from the bad air.
Because of the nature of their work, plague doctors often became victims of the plague themselves, or were quarantined for the protection of the public.

Plague doctors were individuals in the Middle Ages who were given the task of tending to people infected with the plague. In most cases, they were either second rate or under-trained physicians, incapable of maintaining their own practice. Many were not doctors at all, but people of various other employments paid by towns to cater to the sick. 
Plague doctors were employed in various methods when ever plague set in. The earliest documentation of these individuals being hired go as far back as the mid 500s AD. The plague doctor image that we as a general public are familiar with was not seen until the 1600s. It was then that the “traditional” plague doctor costume was created. The costume consisted of a cloak made of heavy fabric covered in wax to protect the doctor’s body, and a mask to keep out the sick air. The masks had a long cone shaped structure at the nose, to be filled with scents that would protect the doctor from the bad air.
Because of the nature of their work, plague doctors often became victims of the plague themselves, or were quarantined for the protection of the public.

Plague doctors were individuals in the Middle Ages who were given the task of tending to people infected with the plague. In most cases, they were either second rate or under-trained physicians, incapable of maintaining their own practice. Many were not doctors at all, but people of various other employments paid by towns to cater to the sick. 
Plague doctors were employed in various methods when ever plague set in. The earliest documentation of these individuals being hired go as far back as the mid 500s AD. The plague doctor image that we as a general public are familiar with was not seen until the 1600s. It was then that the “traditional” plague doctor costume was created. The costume consisted of a cloak made of heavy fabric covered in wax to protect the doctor’s body, and a mask to keep out the sick air. The masks had a long cone shaped structure at the nose, to be filled with scents that would protect the doctor from the bad air.
Because of the nature of their work, plague doctors often became victims of the plague themselves, or were quarantined for the protection of the public.
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sicksin:

Takato Yamamoto Scarlet Maniera.
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uncannyuk:

And another, devilish genie by Gustave Dore from The Arabian Nights.
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funeral-wreaths:

Dieric Bouts, The Fall of the Damned (detail), 1450